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Is This Proper Or Us Notation ?


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#1 Rod

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 10:17 PM

It's 11/11/11 here, now and has been for oo, 11hrs and 14 minutes.
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#2 shagbark

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:03 AM

I believe we are going to a style sheet that always alphabetizes month.
Proper would be 11:14 British Summer Time on 11 November, 2011 or 6:14 Eastern Daylight Time November 11, 2011
that can be shortened to 13:14 (BST) 11 Nov.'11 or 08:14(EDT) Nov. 11th '11
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#3 shagbark

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:11 AM

I am not sure when British summer time ends but I presume it will be over before 11 Nov.
American Daylight savings time ends the first Sunday in November so the times shown above would be off one hour.
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#4 Rod

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 03:25 AM

Ah, now here's a thing.
After considerable research I've discovered that we here in NZ are a day ahead of UK and not as previously informed, a month.
There's someone I have to have a word with... now, who was it...?


>>that can be shortened to 13:14 (BST) 11 Nov.'11 or 08:14(EDT) Nov. 11th '11 <<
what is the meaning of that acronym 'or' ?
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#5 Trillian's Child

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:40 AM

I was taught when doing my secretarial training (in 1973) that the "new" way to write the date is 11 October 2011. No punctuation, the numbers of the date and year are separated by the word for the month. Before that, when my mother was doing her secretarial training (in something like 1936), it was 11th October, 2011. The Americans write it the other way round, October 11th, 2011 - in those days it was American to start a letter with "Gentlemen:" instead of "Dear Sirs," ... but I digress.

I prefer the way I was taught (well, you would, wouldn't you) as it requires no commas to separate the date from the year, both of which obviously have to be written in numbers, whereas the month, as Shagbark says, can also be written in words.

When naming files it makes sense to use YYYYmmDD, although it's just as easy to give them names and sort them according to date.

The British way of writing the date is more logical as you go from smallest unit to middle-sized unit and finish up with the year. There is nothing intuitive about writing first the month, then the day, then the year. No idea how that evolved.

Anyway, once I got to Europe, I was quite at home with the German way of writing dates (11.10.11 or 11.10.2011), but found it odd that the Austrians next door used the same order as the Americans with 10.11.11. Needless to say, this has been known to cause some confusion. The French use oblique strokes, but put the date first, month second: 11/10/11)

The world really should make up its mind and find a universally acceptable and understandable way of writing the date, and while they're at it, they should decide whether thousands should be split by commas or dots, whether the dot, if used as a decimal point, should be on the line, and whether hours and minutes should be divided by colons or single stops.

Perhaps we should adopt the Jewish, Chinese or Moslem calendars, or just start numbering the days as from tomorrow with "1".
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#6 Trillian's Child

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:49 AM

And here in Germany, summertime ends on 30 October. This has in past years been standardised all over Europe. About 20 years ago, I remember there was often a two-week period where our clocks had gone back/forward but not the UK's, so we would have a 2-hour difference or at the other end of the scale, no difference at all. I remember summer time being introduced in the UK

This summer time thing always confused me, until I learned the factoid that October is the longest month of the year, because it has an extra hour. I am really looking forward to that extra hour's sleep - I've been missing it since March.

According to wiki, British Summer Time has been in use since 1916, but there was a hiatus between 1968 and 1971 where they kept to summer time all the year round. I remember that.

Also - according to wiki - Summer Time was introduced in Central Europe much later. I remember all the fuss when it was finally brought in here in Germany in 1980.
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#7 Mr. Dreadful

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 07:16 AM

Rod, I somehow doubt you're a whole month ahead of the rest of us. ;P
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#8 The Thinker

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 03:48 PM

British Summer time ends on Sunday 30 October 2011 at midnight but at 01:00 it goes back to GMT.
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#9 kelli

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 09:34 AM

I bothered to sign up here largely because I was so annoyed nobody had pointed out to Rod that NZ isn't a month ahead of the rest of us...only to find that by the time I'd got a round tuit Mr Dreadful had been and gone and done it for me.

#10 Mrs Zen

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 09:40 AM

Well, the Kiwis are 6 months ahead, aren't they? Or 6 months behind!
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#11 kelli

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 09:44 AM

I thought the joke was along the lines that if it is 10 o'clock on Wednesday morning in Sydney, it is 1953 in Wellington...

#12 Mrs Zen

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 10:16 AM

I shouldn't laugh, should I?
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#13 Rod

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 07:46 PM

Gerroff me back!

Thou shouldst not mock the afflicted
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#14 shagbark

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 01:41 AM

And then there is the American Summer time which was lengthened by President Geo. W. Bush
The bill amends the Uniform Time Act of 1966 by changing the start and end dates of daylight saving time, beginning in 2007. Clocks were set ahead one hour on the second Sunday of March (March 11, 2007) instead of on the first Sunday of April (April 1, 2007). Clocks were set back one hour on the first Sunday in November (November 4, 2007), rather than on the last Sunday of October (October 28, 2007).
Lobbyists for this provision included the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, the National Association of Convenience Stores, and the National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation Fighting Blindness.
Lobbyists against this provision included the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, the National Parent-Teacher Association, the Calendaring and Scheduling Consortium, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Air Transport Association.[11]
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#15 Dmitri Gheorgheni

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 03:44 PM

<rofl> Thank you, Shagbark, for that fascinating list. The mind boggles.
Still hoping for a tinfoil hat smiley.




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