Jump to content





Photo

10 Common interview questions and how to respond


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 randomlyrandom23

randomlyrandom23

    Teachers pet

  • Forum Moderator
  • 2008 posts
  • LocationWorkington, Cumbria

Posted 22 March 2011 - 10:50 AM

*
POPULAR

1. Why do you want this job?
One of the most predictable questions and very important! You need to demonstrate that you have researched the employer and tie your knowledge of them into the skills and interests that led you to apply. For example, an interviewee with a small public relations agency might say:
"I'm always ready to take on responsibility and feel this will come more quickly with a firm of this size. A small firm also gives the chance to build closer working relationships with clients and colleagues and I've found through my past work experience that this makes an organisation more effective as well as more satisfying to work in."
Try to find some specific feature on which the employer prides themselves: their training, their client base, their individuality, their public image, etc. This may not always be possible with very small organisations but you may be able to pick up something of this nature from the interviewer.

2. Have you got any questions?
At the end of the interview, it is likely that you will be given the chance to put your own questions to the interviewer.
Keep them brief: there may be other interviewees waiting.
Ask about the work itself, training and career development: not about holidays, pensions, and season ticket loans!
Prepare some questions in advance: it is OK to write these down and to refer to your notes to remind yourself of what you wanted to ask.
It often happens that, during the interview, all the points that you had noted down to ask about will be covered before you get to this stage. In this situation, you can respond as follows:
Interviewer: Well, that seems to have covered everything: is there anything you would like to ask me?

Interviewee: Thank you: I'd made a note to ask about your appraisal system and the study arrangements for professional exams, but we went over those earlier and I really feel you've covered everything that I need to know at this moment.


You can also use this opportunity to tell the interviewer anything about yourself that they have not raised during the interview but which you fell is important to your application:

Don't feel you have to wait until this point to ask questions - if the chance to ask a question seems to arise naturally in the course of the interview, take it! Remember that a traditional interview is a conversation - with a purpose.

Examples of questions you can ask the interviewer
These are just a few ideas - you should certainly not attempt to ask them all and indeed it's best to formulate your own questions tailored to your circumstances and the job you are being interviewed for! Make sure you have researched the employer carefully, so that you are not asking for information which you should be expected to know already.

Is there a fixed period of training for graduates?
I see it is possible to switch job functions - how often does this happen?
Do you send your managers on external training courses?
Where would I be based - is this job function located only in ...?
How easy is it for new graduates to find accommodation in this area?
How often is a graduate's performance appraised?
What is a typical career path in this job function?
Can you give me more details of your training programme?
Will I be working in a team? If so, what is the make-up of these teams?
What is the turnover of graduates in this company?
What are the possibilities of using my languages?
What are the travel/mobility requirements of this job?
How would you see this company developing over the next five years?
How would you describe the atmosphere in this company?
What is your personal experience of working for this organisation?

3. Describe a situation in which you lead a team.
This is an example of a competency-based question. Many graduate positions involve people management, where you will be expected to plan, organise and guide the work of others as well as motivating them to complete tasks. The interviewer needs to assess how well you relate to other people, what role you take in a group and whether you are able to focus on goals and targets.
Outline the situation, your role and the task of the group overall. Describe any problems which arose and how they were tackled. Say what the result was and what you learned from it. Examples could include putting on a drama or music production; a group project at university; a business game or Young Enterprise scheme or being team leader in a fast-food restaurant.
This, and other skills which the employer considers essential for effective performance in the job, should have been highlighted in the job description or graduate brochure - so always be prepared to give examples of situations where you have demonstrated these qualities! While your example should indicate the nature of the team and the task, you need to focus on your own role as leader and on the personal qualities that led you to take on/be nominated for this role and which helped you to succeed in it. Leadership involves many skills: planning, decision-making, persuading, motivating, listening, co-ordinating - but not dictating!

4. Describe a situation where you worked in a team
Another competency-based question. Most jobs will involve a degree of teamwork. The interviewer needs to assess how well you relate other people, what role you take in a group and whether you are able to focus on goals and targets.

Outline the situation, your particular role and the task of the group overall. Describe any problems which arose and how they were tackled. Say what the result was and what you learned from it.

Examples could include putting on a drama or music production; a group project at university; a business game or "Young Enterprise" scheme or working in a fast-food restaurant.

5. What do you expect to be doing in 5 years time?
Try to avoid vague or general answers such as “I would hope to grow with the responsibility I am offered and to develop my skills as far as I am able” or “I would expect to be in a management role by then”.
This question allows you to demonstrate that you have done your research on the career routes open to you within the organisation and so you should try to be more specific - not necessarily tying yourself down to a particular route, but showing that you have at least a general idea of where you want to go.
Use the employer's recruitment literature to gain an idea of the career paths followed by past graduates. You may be able to supplement this by showing your knowledge of professional bodies and the steps you will need to take to gain their qualifications, e.g. in areas such as marketing or personnel.

6. What are your weaknesses?
One interviewee, asked about her weaknesses, thought briefly and then replied "Wine, chocolate and men - though not necessarily in that order."
She got the job!

The classic answer here is to state a strength which is disguised as a weakness, such as "I'm too much of a perfectionist" or "I push myself too hard". This approach has been used so often that, even if these answers really are true they sound clichéd. Also, interviewers will know this trick. If you feel they really apply to you, give examples: you could say that your attention to detail and perfectionism make you very single-minded when at work, often blotting out others in your need to get the task done.
A better strategy, is to choose a weakness that you have worked on to improve and describe what action you are taking to remedy the weakness. For example: "I'm not a very self-confident person and used to find it very difficult to talk to people I didn't know well, but my Saturday job in the local library meant that I had to help people with all kinds of queries and that helped me a lot. Now I'm perfectly happy talking to anybody on a one-to-one basis and I've joined the debating society this year to give me experience of speaking in front of an audience."
Don't deny that you have any weaknesses - everyone has weaknesses and if you refuse to admit to them the interviewer will mark you down as arrogant, untruthful or lacking in self-awareness

This question may be phrased in other ways, such as "How would your worst enemy describe you?"

7. Who else have you applied to/got interviews with?
You are being asked to demonstrate the consistency of your career aims as well as your interest in the job for which you are being interviewed. So if you have applied to one large accountancy firm it is reasonable to assume you will be applying to them all.
What you can certainly say in your favour, however, is that the present employer is your first choice. You may even answer the question by explaining you have yet to apply to any other organisations for this very reason. Perhaps your application to the other firms is imminent, depending on the stage you are at in the recruitment cycle.
Give examples that are:
Relevant - related to the business you are presently being interviewed for
Prestigious. They will reflect well on the firm interviewing you
Consistent. Not from lots of different job areas or employment groups of less interest to you than the present opportunity
Successful so far. Do not list those firms who have rejected you.


8. Why did you choose your university and what factors influenced your choice?
If you had, in fact, no real choice in where you went to University - e.g. if you had to study close to home for financial or family reasons - you can talk about the more general issues you had to consider in coming to University and perhaps lead the question round to your choice of course rather than institution.
Your actual answer is less important than the evidence of decision-making, planning and logical reasoning skills that it should demonstrate. This is an opportunity for you to demonstrate these key skills.

9. What are your strengths?
This allows you to put across your "Unique Selling Points" - three or four of your key strengths. Try to back these points up with examples of where you have had to use them.

Consider the requirements of the job and compare these with all your own attributes - your personality, skills, abilities or experience. Where they match you should consider these to be your major strengths. The employer certainly will.

For example, team work, interpersonal skills, creative problem solving, dependability, reliability, originality, leadership etc., could all be cited as strengths. Work out which is most important for the particular job in question and make sure you illustrate your answer with examples from as many parts of your experience, not just university, as you can.

This question may be phrased in other ways, such as "Tell me about yourself" or "How would a friend describe you?"

10. What has been your greatest achievement?
To say that your greatest achievement was getting to University, or getting your degree, will do nothing to distinguish you from all the other candidates. Unless you have had to contend with exceptional difficulties to gain your academic qualifications - such as illness or major family problems - try to say something different that will make you stand out.

This doesn't have to be an Olympic medal or an act of heroism. Ideally, it should give evidence of skills relevant to the job such as communication, initiative, teamwork, organising or determination:

Duke of Edinburgh's gold award - especially the expedition and community service parts
Organising a sports or fund-raising event
"Overcoming my fear of heights and learning to abseil"
"Learning enough Spanish in three months to make myself understood when I traveled around Mexico"
Training for and completing a marathon .. or even a 5 Kilometre race


randomlyrandom23 / Erica

Email me



#2 Lea2975

Lea2975

    linguist extraordinaire

  • Members
  • 2884 posts
  • Chat Name:Lea2975
  • LocationWest Yorkshire

Posted 22 March 2011 - 05:10 PM

I would add to that:

Have you ever been in a situation where... questions
eg have you ever been in a situation where you've had to deal with an awkward customer and how did you act.

this was in my interview for my current position at tesco - and my answer was something like, I worked in a shop before and this one day there was one customer who had an issue with a product we had sold. I spoke to the customer in a calm tone of voice and listened to their problem, and replaced the product referring it to the manager and the customer went off a lot happier.

You can make mistakes in life but it is how you deal with them that makes you a better person or a worse person.


#3 Johnterry807

Johnterry807

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 02:26 PM

Hi,
I am also very interested in this subject, but the reference is very limited. You can share documents as well as experience? Thanks!



#4 hdblue

hdblue

    First Day

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 27 August 2011 - 12:53 AM

Hi,
I am also very interested in this subject, but the reference is very limited. You can share documents as well as experience? Thanks!



Hi,

Thank very much for your comment. It help me to think about for my ideals.



We also find them more same at: Interpersonal Skills Interview Questions

Tks again.




#5 Pants-Of-Destruction

Pants-Of-Destruction

    Needs to talk more

  • Members
  • 119 posts
  • LocationHull

Posted 27 August 2011 - 12:55 AM

A question I often get asked, is " Why have you brought a live panda to this interview ? "

And, you know, I haven't come up with a suitable reply yet.
Posted Image I like to stop at the duty free shop

#6 amber leaf

amber leaf

    Makes friends easily

  • Members
  • 706 posts

Posted 27 August 2011 - 02:04 AM

A question I often get asked, is " Why have you brought a live panda to this interview ? "

And, you know, I haven't come up with a suitable reply yet.

Could always say, Because a dead one would be too much of a drag :CARD:

#7 Lea2975

Lea2975

    linguist extraordinaire

  • Members
  • 2884 posts
  • Chat Name:Lea2975
  • LocationWest Yorkshire

Posted 27 August 2011 - 09:54 PM


List of Top 10 Situational Interview Questions
Taken from Situational Question website

You can make mistakes in life but it is how you deal with them that makes you a better person or a worse person.


#8 Johnterry807

Johnterry807

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 16 September 2011 - 03:51 AM

Hi,
I am also very interested in this subject, but the reference is very limited. You can share documents as well as experience? Thanks!

#9 skyrider

skyrider

    Getting there

  • Members
  • 192 posts

Posted 16 September 2011 - 09:02 AM

Ive always found the question "what are your weakness's?" to be a rather unfair question. The whole point of an interview is to put yourself across to the interviewer in a way that will entice them to want to employ you. Documenting weakness's i think is totally counter-productive to that. Strictly speaking; it wouldent be a weakness if what you said did not sound negative.

#10 xXPoohXx

xXPoohXx

    Teachers pet

  • Forum Admin
  • 2978 posts
  • LocationSomerset

Posted 16 September 2011 - 09:39 AM

aha.. but the positive side of knowing what your weaknesses may be is knowing if the situation arose, you're more likely to work together with someone to get it resolved rather than attempt to do something yourself alone and get it wrong perhaps?

not only that, we learn from our mistakes too.. so if you did have a weakness before.. you can always go on to say how you overcame this and turned it into something positive.

Posted Image
Noesis Forum Admin - Staff
Chat Navigator (Noesis UK)
Email me


#11 hated female

hated female

    Getting there

  • -Members
  • 168 posts
  • Locationsouth west

Posted 18 September 2011 - 03:34 PM

aha.. but the positive side of knowing what your weaknesses may be is knowing if the situation arose, you're more likely to work together with someone to get it resolved rather than attempt to do something yourself alone and get it wrong perhaps?

not only that, we learn from our mistakes too.. so if you did have a weakness before.. you can always go on to say how you overcame this and turned it into something positive.

i rem once wen i went to bristol airport for a job and was interviewd by the most horriblist man u wish to have met he asked me wot made me think he shud give me the job of putting suitcases on the conveyour belt i wasnt ready for the wuestion and was kinda stuck for words i cud feel my self burning up to cut a long story short i didnt get the job
<p>hello every one my names&nbsp;&nbsp;jess i have been on lycos&nbsp;&nbsp;chat 6 years i still like to call it that cos to&nbsp;&nbsp;me its still&nbsp;&nbsp;lycos&nbsp;&nbsp;love u hal pavelxxxxxxx</p>

#12 Foxglove911

Foxglove911

    Getting there

  • Members
  • 229 posts
  • Chat Name:Foxglove911

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:49 PM

Ive always found the question &quot;what are your weakness's?&quot; to be a rather unfair question. The whole point of an interview is to put yourself across to the interviewer in a way that will entice them to want to employ you. Documenting weakness's i think is totally counter-productive to that. Strictly speaking; it wouldent be a weakness if what you said did not sound negative.

aha.. but the positive side of knowing what your weaknesses may be is knowing if the situation arose, you're more likely to work together with someone to get it resolved rather than attempt to do something yourself alone and get it wrong perhaps?

not only that, we learn from our mistakes too.. so if you did have a weakness before.. you can always go on to say how you overcame this and turned it into something positive.

I ways overcome this question with a positive weakness. For example: "im a clean freak and I obess with my work space being clean" depending on what type of work you do that would be a positive weakness. Just because its a weakness doesnt mean it has to be a bad weakness.
The above post may contain comments of humour, sarcasm or personal opinion, These comments do not necessarily reflect the views of the reader or their affiliates.
Reader discretion is advised.

#13 randomlyrandom23

randomlyrandom23

    Teachers pet

  • Forum Moderator
  • 2008 posts
  • LocationWorkington, Cumbria

Posted 29 September 2011 - 07:25 AM

Yes, another few good 'weaknesses' are:

I'm a perfectionist and have to make sure everything is absolutely perfect.

I always need to finish a task that I have started no matter how hard it seems to be.

I become dedicated to a company quickly and this can lead to me sometimes over working myself for my employers.

randomlyrandom23 / Erica

Email me


#14 SilentWolf

SilentWolf

    Resident Oracle

  • Members
  • 1283 posts
  • Chat Name:SilentWolf
  • LocationUK

Posted 08 October 2011 - 12:01 AM

Il be spending some time reading all these links etc and hounding google over the weekend and making notes

I have an interview coming up this week so will be making notes of possible questions and any key words as to give good answers

As i have always thought

"Fail to prepare then prepare to fail"

#15 hamburg113

hamburg113

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 24 October 2011 - 12:31 AM

Hi,

Good ideal, pls try to keep posting. I like this topic very much and I will digged this one. Tks again.

#16 amber leaf

amber leaf

    Makes friends easily

  • Members
  • 706 posts

Posted 24 October 2011 - 04:23 PM

I have always ask the Pay and Hours. I see no point in going for a job if I can't do it.
Must work as I've never been unemployed, even when made Redundant. Week off looking, then start some where eles.

The longer any ones Unemployed then the harder to convince a new Employer that your worth Employing.

#17 hdblue

hdblue

    First Day

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 08:15 AM

Hi,

Thank very much for the reply. It help me to think about for my ideals. I'll send later.

Tks again.

#18 hdblue

hdblue

    First Day

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 02:53 AM

Hi,

Thank very much for the reply. It help me to think about for my ideals. I'll send later.

Tks again.


We also find them more same at: How to answer interview questions

#19 hamburg113

hamburg113

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 02:41 PM

If you want to get more materials that related to this topic, you can visit:
*Link Removed*



Best regards.

Edited by xXPoohXx, 29 October 2011 - 03:06 PM.
Link removed as it doesnt go to a website that exists anymore.


#20 S.A. Jobs

S.A. Jobs

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 17 November 2011 - 08:43 AM

Thanks this really has been a great help since I have been looking for employment and I have been compiling my answers for those questions.

*Link Removed*

Edited by xXPoohXx, 17 November 2011 - 10:50 AM.
Thank you for your input however please do not advertise your website in posts. Thank you


#21 vollox

vollox

    Must try harder

  • Members
  • 75 posts
  • LocationUK and Shenzhen

Posted 23 November 2011 - 04:55 PM

Hi,
I am also very interested in this subject, but the reference is very limited. You can share documents as well as experience? Thanks!


I found this useful: http://www.kent.ac.u...onquestions.htm

#22 amber leaf

amber leaf

    Makes friends easily

  • Members
  • 706 posts

Posted 15 January 2012 - 06:46 PM

How to write a successful CV before applying for a job

Posted Image Getting a CV up to scratch is an important part of the job searching process<p class="story-feature related narrow">Continue reading the main story
Related Stories
A good curriculum vitae - or CV - is vital when looking for work, especially when there are numerous candidates for the same job, so what should it contain?
There is no perfect template, and each sector may require a different emphasis on a different aspect of the content, such as career history or qualifications.
However, experts suggest there are some basic rules on how a CV should be written and the information that should be included.
Overall, a CV should be neat and typed if possible. Most libraries now have public computers, if you do not have your own.
It should also be short, usually no more than two sides of A4. It should be positive, stressing achievements and strengths, and make a good impression in a clear and positive way.
The basic format for a CV includes:
  • Personal details, including name, address, phone number, email address and possibly any professional social media presence. You no longer need to include your date of birth, owing to age discrimination rules
  • Career history, starting with your most recent job first. Include dates and temporary or voluntary jobs if appropriate
  • A personal profile which sells yourself and your qualities, tailored towards the job you are applying for
  • Achievements from previous jobs that are relevant
  • Qualifications and training from previous jobs, with the most recent first
  • Interests, if they are relevant and especially if the skills or teamwork concerned are relevant for the job
  • Any extra information, such as reasons for a career change or reasons for gaps in career history, such as caring duties
  • References, ideally two or more and including a recent employer
Corinne Mills is managing director of Personal Career Management, which offers careers coaching. She says that a straightforward font and formatting is required - and the spelling must be checked and checked again.
"Poor spelling is the quickest way of getting a rejection," she says.
She adds that people should check five or six adverts for a particular job and then use the common requirements to mould their CV.
"Many people think that one CV will fit all applications, but it needs to be a very targeted document for the role they are going for. Do some research so you understand what employers are looking for."
Help and examples
Each CV needs to be tailored towards your own skills, experiences and your job application.
However, the Directgov website has CV example templates for a care worker and for a construction worker.
There is also a writing a CV factsheet which can be downloaded.
For those looking for a job, a database of jobs held by Jobcentre Plus is a good place to start.
In addition, there is a separate database of jobs in Northern Ireland.
Skills Development Scotland has advice on finding a job, dealing with redundancy and links to Scotland-specific jobs sites.
Next Steps, in England, has advice including where to look for funding for courses to learn new skills.
Careers Wales has bi-lingual advice covers all these areas and also includes help for jobseekers under 19.
Global tips
CVs can be produced in a different format for job applications outside of the UK.
For example, the equivalent of the CV in the US is the "resume".
This has much the same aims by outlining job talents, work history, education and career goals, as well as how a candidate's experience and skills would be suited to the job being advertised.
One guide to writing resumes and cover letters is on the New York State Department of Labor's website.

#23 Owen224.v2

Owen224.v2

    Getting there

  • Members
  • 158 posts
  • LocationBirmingham, UK

Posted 20 March 2012 - 11:54 PM

Tell me about yourself?

My answer: ...

Ugh. I hate that question.

#24 tra072011

tra072011

    First Day

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 24 August 2012 - 03:08 PM

Hi

You can find this info by using search box in the top of website with some keywords related before posting questions.

#25 irreRany

irreRany

    First Day

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 03:08 AM

it`s nice
Posted Image

#26 chu082011

chu082011

    First Day

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 13 September 2012 - 06:12 AM

Dear friends

I like 10 Common interview questions and how to respond very much.

Very useful for me.

Rgs




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users